Apalachicola Bay and Riverkeeper, Inc.
Box 8
232-b Water Street
Apalachicola FL 32329
Contact Information
Address Box 8
232-b Water Street
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Telephone (850) 653-8936
E-mail riverkeeper@apalachicolariverkeeper.org
Alternate Address 232 -b Water Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320
At A Glance
Organization DBA
Apalachicola Riverkeeper
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
EIN Number 59-3550426
Year of Incorporation 1999
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $208,475.00
Projected Expenses $208,100.00
Mission Statement
The mission of the Apalachicola Riverkeeper is to provide stewardship and advocacy for the protection of the Apalachicola River and Bay, its tributaries and watersheds, in order to improve and maintain its environmental integrity and to preserve the natural, scenic, recreational, and commercial fishing character of these waterways.
 
Needs Statement
  • Apalachicola Riverkeeper is currently seeking 150,000 in funding to support our priority project. This is a multi-phased project that will involve the geomorphologic assessment, analysis, evaluation and restoration project prioritization necessary for identifying the actions needed to assess, restore, improve, manage and sustain riverine habitat of the Apalachicola River.
  • General mission support to maintain momentum in providing outreach and (public) education on the need to restore, protect and preserve the Apalachicola River and Bay

  • Specific technical, administrative, scientific and environmental expertise must be procured in order for Apalachicola Riverkeeper to continue in its to date highly effective role in impacting local, State and National environmental policy negotiating a tristate solution and developing a sustainable water management plan to equitably allocate water between Georgia, Alabama and Florida

  • Present staff and volunteers are well-partnered to plan and manage multiple and complex activities; however, to effectively coordinate and execute those plans, more resources are needed immediately.

The needs of the resource exceed our resources to meet those needs. We need financial and in-kind support from all those who believe (as we do) that this is a natural resource worth saving. 

Impact Statement

The Apalachicola River and Estuary system is of exceptional ecological importance, and constitutes one of the least polluted, most undeveloped, resource-rich systems left in the United States. It has been designated by the United Nations as an International Biosphere Reserve, by the United States as a National Estuarine Research Reserve, and by the State of Florida as an Outstanding Florida Water. The River harbors the most diverse assemblage of freshwater fish in Florida, the largest number of species of freshwater snails and mussels, and the most endemic species in western Florida. 

Apalachicola Bay is one of the most productive estuaries in the northern hemisphere, historically supporting commercially important oyster beds and a wide variety of fish, and providing habitat for migratory birds and other animals. The river basin is home to some of the highest densities of reptile and amphibian species on the continent. The Apalachicola River and Bay are closely linked, as River waters and its inundated floodplain is the biological factory that fuels the productivity of the estuary.

 2015: Goal I   Restore lost Apalachicola floodplain habitat Objective: Develop and implement a Comprehensive Restoration Plan for the Apalachicola River Goal II Restore life-sustaining freshwater flows in the Apalachicola River Objective: Complete 7th year of work with the tristate ACF Stakeholder coalition resulting in a Strategic Water Management Plan for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin Goal III Prevent Point and Nonpoint Source Pollution Objective: Protect the Apalachicola river from coal ash pollution (through legal means), address current pollution stemming from the Scholz Coal Fired Power Plant.

Selected Accomplishments in 2014:

  • Successfully led a coalition initiative of public and private partners to get the Apalachicola River officially designated as a National Recreation Trail by the United States Department of Interior This was a hard-won effort to promote the river as a natural resource of National significance resulted in the Apalachicola River being officially designated on June 6th, 2014. See official designation letter and subsequent press release from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

  • Spearheaded a highly successful petition drive and campaign for passage of a local “Leave No Trace” ordinance for Franklin County’s public Beach Coastline in an effort to reduce habitat degradation and prevent harm to nesting sea turtles.

  • Sponsored a county-wide coastal clean-up on September 20 as part of the International Coastal Clean-up Day 2014. Apalachicola Riverkeeper and its co-sponsors—Ocean Conservancy and the Franklin County Departments of Parks & Recreation and Solid Waste & Recycling, worked side-by-side with 321 volunteers to pick up nearly 7.5 tons of garbage from the area’s coastline, river banks, estuaries and bridge causeways.

  • Mounted a campaign through social media in an effort to rally public opposition to the State DEP’s 10-year development plan for the State Park on St. George Island. This initiative succeeded getting the State DEP to pull and revise its plan.

 

 

Background Statement

The Apalachicola River and Estuary system is of exceptional ecological importance, and constitutes one of the least polluted, most undeveloped, resource-rich systems left in the United States. It has been designated by the United Nations as an International Biosphere Reserve, by the United States as a National Estuarine Research Reserve, and by the State of Florida as an Outstanding Florida Water. The River harbors the most diverse assemblage of freshwater fish in Florida, the largest number of species of freshwater snails and mussels, and the most endemic species in western Florida. 

Apalachicola Bay is one of the most productive estuaries in the northern hemisphere, historically supporting commercially important oyster beds and a wide variety of fish, and providing habitat for migratory birds and other animals. The river basin is home to some of the highest densities of reptile and amphibian species on the continent. The Apalachicola River and Bay are closely linked, as River waters and its inundated floodplain is the biological factory that fuels the productivity of the estuary. 

 Apalachicola Riverkeeper is often the River’s only front line of defense against environmental destruction and works strategically through collaboration, legislation and (as a last resort) litigation to protect this one-of-a-kind resource. The Riverkeeper is dedicated to reversing the environmental degradation of the past and to promoting new strategies and policies to protect the water quality of the Apalachicola River, and its flows into the Apalachicola Bay. 

The Apalachicola River is also one of the last estuarine ecosystems of its kind. The River gives life to the Bay, Basin, Floodplain and Watershed and all are threatened by piecemeal management on nearly every front.

The Riverkeeper works to ensure that clean water laws are enforced – holding government agencies accountable for stopping polluters from contaminating the Basin and maintaining the River’s flow into the Bay.

This 1400-member-strong volunteer organization works every day to restore, protect, and preserve this unique ecosystem. As the River’s watchdog, the Apalachicola Riverkeeper is fighting for this resource with every tool at its disposal – advocacy, water quality monitoring and science, on-the-water patrols, public education and, when necessary, legal action.

Since our founding in 1999, Apalachicola Riverkeeper has received support from individuals through affordable organizational memberships, individual donations, volunteer-led fundraisers and grants from philanthropic foundations and government.  
Service Categories
Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
Areas of Service
Areas Served
Areas
Franklin
Gulf
Liberty
Wakulla
Franklin
Jackson
Gadsden
Office is located on the Bay in Apalachicola, Franklin County
Board Chair Statement

There is nowhere else on earth like it. The Apalachicola River Basin has been designated by the United Nations as an International Biosphere Reserve, by the United States as a National Blueway Trail and by the State of Florida as an Outstanding Florida Water. The Apalachicola harbors the most diverse assemblage of freshwater fish in Florida, the largest number of species of freshwater snails and the highest densities of reptile and amphibian species on the continent. The Apalachicola River Basin is also home to the Tupelo trees that produce the tastiest honey on the planet.

Quite simply, this natural resource is a natural wonder – one of the most ecologically important, resource-rich systems left in the United States. Some even believe the biblical Garden of Eden once lay along the banks of the Apalachicola. The Apalachicola River and Bay are closely linked, as the river’s water and its inundated floodplain is the biological factory that fuels the productivity of the Apalachicola Bay, home to the world’s finest oysters and a nursery for numerous species of fish, shellfish and other sea life.
So what can you give the river that has everything? A chance to survive and even thrive once again!

The river is in trouble. Drought and overuse are reducing its flow to dangerously low levels and her countless creeks, sloughs and ponds are running dry. Delicate natural systems have been thrown into chaos, putting the estuary in jeopardy. The oyster industry is on the verge of collapse and other fisheries are suffering as well. This spectacular part of our natural world – one of the richest, most diverse ecosystems on the planet – depends upon all of us for its survival. Apalachicola Riverkeeper is the only organization whose sole purpose is to restore and protect the Apalachicola River system. And we need your help now to continue the struggle to accomplish our mission. We are more committed than ever to saving the Apalachicola River and Bay because when it’s gone, it may be gone forever. Like you, we want to make sure that the river and bay, and all of the basin’s plants, animals, marine life, communities, and the fishing industry are still here in the future.

This is about more than just water. It’s a struggle to preserve a natural treasure, to protect a way of life and to save the jobs of hardworking men and women who depend on the Apalachicola Bay for their living. Science and common sense tell us that the solution is a comprehensive management plan that balances the needs of the estuary and the upstream interests. But politics and never-ending litigation are standing in the way of meaningful progress. The going has never been tougher and the stakes have never been higher. This river that has given us so much now depends on all of us to give something back. Your financial support is critical to making sure those in power know how important this is to you.
 

This is a struggle we can win, but we need your help…Please help us restore the Apalachicola River and save the remarkable Apalachicola Bay by making your contribution today.


CEO Statement/Executive Director Statement

Apalachicola Riverkeeper is a 1400+ member non-profit organization dedicated to the protection and stewardship of the Apalachicola River and Bay. As part of the Waterkeeper Alliance, Apalachicola Riverkeeper, along with our members and volunteers, is the River’s “voice”, working to focus public and political attention on the importance of saving this last-of-its-kind resource. Through advocacy, we build new partnerships and develop collaborative approaches to address the most serious threats to the River and the Bay.

Since our founding in 1999, Apalachicola Riverkeeper has received support from individuals through affordable organizational memberships, individual donations, and volunteer-led fundraisers. We also receive support in the form of grants from philanthropic foundations and government agencies, as well as gifts from local businesses. We work tirelessly to make the most of our limited resources by partnering with numerous other stakeholders who believe, as we do, that all of us share responsibility for preserving this American Treasure. 

In 2015, we continue to improve the tools we use in our public education and outreach. Last year we developed and launched a completely revamped organizational website: www.apalachicolariverkeeper.org and better utilized social media with the intent to create a broader public awareness, understanding and support for this unique natural resource.  

Staff: Dan Tonsmeire, Riverkeeper (2004-present) – science and technical consultation; watershed restoration program planning; resource (River, Bay, Basin and Watershed) leadership, advocacy & management; constituency stakeholder relations; riparian communities governmental relations Shannon Lease, M.S., C.P.M, Executive Director – (12/2013 – present) – organizational planning, strategy and leadership; Board management, public relations, day-to-day operational oversight; event planning, coordination and fundraising; marketing and organizational communications. 

In addition to these paid staff members, Apalachicola Riverkeeper is fortunate to have recruited a cadre of volunteers who devote time in the office, to program projects in the field and to special community events and fundraisers. 1400+ supporting members – located in the Apalachicola Basin and throughout the United States. Many of these members also volunteer their time and talents to the organization.Governance: 15-seat volunteer Board of Directors. As an organization, Apalachicola Riverkeeper continues to leverage its limited resources to make critical gains in preserving this resource. Without funding from concerned and knowledgeable public and private funders outside our immediate area we would not be able to do the work. 

Description

 

Apalachicola Riverkeeper is Florida's representative in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint Stakeholders (ACFS) www.acfstakeholders.org . This program represents multiple numerous and diverse entities within Florida, Georgia and Alabama who all have a vested interest in the outcome of the entrenched and persistent “water wars” between these three States. The purpose for Riverkeeper helping to establish this stakeholder group was to create a different approach to developing equitable water allocation methodologies, one that does NOT involve time-wasting  and unsuccessful (for Florida) litigation In 2011, Riverkeeper, Dan Tonsmeire, served as chair of the 56-member Governing Board of the ACFS. (2009 – ongoing)

As chair of the ACF Stakeholder’s, the Riverkeeper helped to orchestrate a consensus among the stakeholder entities to conduct the first-ever (neutral) instream flow assessment and agreement to abide by the results. The data from this assessment is extremely important as it lays the groundwork for the Apalachicola Riverkeeper to continue to facilitate a sustainable water management plan that will document an equitable allocation of water for all three states in the future – a problem that has compounded and confounded leaders in all three states for more than 20 years. This program is highly dynamic and requires intense Lawmaker education & advocacy and public education/input and legislative policy development, all requiring regular travel to the States of Georgia and Alabama. This year, Apalachicola Riverkeeper and its partner organization (Riparian County Stakeholder Coalition – RCSC) were key players in getting public dollars to find the answers to the problems in the River and to figure out why  the Apalachicola Bay had a collapse in productivity in 2012. 

 

Budget $0.00
Category Environment, General/Other Environmental & Sustainable Design
Population Served US, Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated, Families
Short Term Success Short-term: A comprehensive assessment/evaluation of the River's flow levels and the impacts those levels have on Apalachicola Bay's estuary/oyster habitat. Information derived from this evaluation is required for the ACF Stakeholders mult-step process to develop a viable water allocation plan. Partial funding for this assessment was passed in Florida's 2013 legislature and awaiting the signature of the Governor (May, 2013)  
Long term Success Achieving the objective of this program will result in a sustainable water management plan for the Apalachicola River. This plan will provide the guidance the US Army Corps of Engineers needs in order to equitably allocate the River's flow among Georgia, Florida and Alabama. Success will also lead to a comprehensive approach to managing the Apalachicola Bay as the important resource that it truly is....
Program Success Monitored By Program is intensively and continually evaluated by the tri-state stakeholder's governance structure as well as the Board of Directors for the Apalachicola Riverkeeper. The Riverkeeper provides regular reports to the Board of Directors. 
Examples of Program Success Led the establishment of the Apalachicola sub-basin caucus – part of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint Stakeholders (ACFS), a 56 member group of diverse entities working to develop an sustainable water management plan – a plan that will be the foundation for equitably allocating ACF waters between Georgia, Alabama and Florida taking a facilitated approach (rather than money wasting litigation) to the “water war” between these three States - a problem that has compounded and confounded leaders in all three states for more than 20 years. Riverkeeper, Dan Tonsmeire, chaired the 56-member Governing Board of the ACFS. (2009 – 2010) helping to orchestrate a consensus among the stakeholder entities to conduct the first-ever (neutral) instream flow assessment and agreement to abide by the results.
Description As part of its mission to reach out and educate the public, Apalachicola Riverkeeper offers a guided kayak/canoe paddle expedition to the public. The paddle is free to members with a suggested donation for non-members. This program provides the public who might otherwise never be exposed to this national treasure natural resource, an opportunity to experience the mighty Apalachicola River up close and personal. The suggested donations from the public do not cover the cost to obtain and maintain canoes, kayaks and all associated paddle and safety gear.
Budget $15,000.00
Category Environment, General/Other Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
Population Served US& International, General/Unspecified,
Short Term Success Near term, we are hoping to motivate the public who experience these excursions to get involved politically to impact policy makers. We have had much success with individuals, having paddled the Apalach, contacting their legislators, our Governor and Congress to express their support for legislation to permanently protect the River and Bay.
Long term Success By exposing the public to the experience of how rare and precious the Apalachicola is as a  natural resource, we hope to create an entire generation of individuals who accept the shared responsibility we all have to protect this precious and at-risk resource
Program Success Monitored By Actively evaluated each month for opportunities to improve the experience and safety of the expedition.
Examples of Program Success The numbers of individuals requesting to go on the 4th Saturday Paddle has doubled in the last year - from an average of 5-6 to 12+.  Riverkeeper now has more requests to go on the paddle each month than we can accomodate. The program needs to grow and donations will help Apalachicola Riverkeeper to purchase additional equipment and recruit additional experienced guides to lead the expeditions.
Description

The Apalachicola Riverkeeper and Friends of the Franklin County Public Library have partnered in a program to  restore the wetlands surrounding the Franklin County Public Library in Eastpoint, FL. The program will provide  onsite environmental educational  opportunities, including a trail. 

According to Apalachicola Riverkeeper Executive Director and Riverkeeper Dan Tonsmeire:  “We plan to do fuel reduction of underbrush and thinning of some trees in order to enhance the wetland and optimize the natural community’s habitat function. Also, we will evaluate the site’s long-term vegetation management plan.”  

Benefits to fuel reduction and thinning include prevention of wildfires and reduction of fire hazards to homeowners. An exemption permit for this activity was issued in April 2012 by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to the Friends of the Franklin County Public Library. 

An initial grant from the Northwest Florida Water Management District secured a beautiful 13-acre site on Old Ferry Dock Road.  Fundraising efforts have resulted in a concrete slab and exterior completion of a 5,000-square-foot library and administrative office building.

Ongoing fundraising by the Friends of Franklin County Public Library will complete and furnish the interior of the building. When the library is finished, it will offer the community not only an expanded, modern space for collections and programs, but educational nature walks over the protected wetlands. 

Budget $20,000.00
Category Environment, General/Other Environmental Education
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years), Families, General/Unspecified
Short Term Success This will effectively create a close-to-home community wildlife sanctuary. Having such a library facility will provide an unprecedented learning environment that heretofore was not available to this sector of our community’s population.
Long term Success

Project Benefits- Recovery of the wetland habitat and upland functions on 7 acres will enhance water quality and habitat on the site, including benefits to wildlife.  The educational awareness conceptual plan design will provide documentation adequate to advertise for request for bids to complete detailed design and implementation of the project.  The final development of this project will improve local awareness of the benefits of wetland, particularly the importance of wetlands in residential coastal areas.  The library location is ideal for students to learn about the importance of wetland buffers and how critical these habitats are to wildlife and water quality. The public will be able to see first-hand that these endangered habitats can be recovered and, with careful stewardship and balanced land management practices, maintained forever.  Not addressing the loss of these habitats could mean proportionately decreasing water quality, coastal shoreline erosion and negative impacts to fish and wildlife.  Floridians depend on healthy and diverse ecosystem habitats, not only because they provide us with recreational opportunities and food, but also because they support our commercial fishing, tourism, and recreation industries.

Program Success Monitored By This program is supported by funds from the Northwest Florida Water Management District and is closely monitored via quarterly reporting and onsite evaluation of progress
Examples of Program Success The program is on-track with the initial phase - nearly complete as of May/2013. (Approximately 7 acres of uplands and wetlands are planned for restoration by thinning the trees and brush, and by reducing vegetation, by hydro-chopping, and potentially burning of understory to reduce fuel and optimize the natural community’s habitat function).
Description Develop, implement and fund a Comprehensive Restoration Plan It is critical that Florida develop a coordinated, science-based, comprehensive approach to restoring the Apalachicola River and Bay. The Apalachicola River floodplain has been negatively impacted by river level declines and geomorphologic changes due to over 40 years of increasing upstream water use, navigation channel maintenance activities and climatic changes. Comprehensive Restoration planning is needed immediately to galvanize and organize local, state and federal stakeholders to coordinate restoration efforts. Apalachicola Riverkeeper, Florida Wildlife Federation and the National Wildlife Federation have formed a planning workgroup for the purpose of developing a detailed and comprehensive restoration plan proposal. The plan will incorporate detailed and prioritized projects, and a component for coordinating and integrating the efforts of other entities proposing related projects. 
Budget $150,000.00
Category Environment, General/Other Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
Population Served US, US, US
Short Term Success

 This is a multi-year project to undertake feasible, scientifically-based restoration projects, and to monitor their results. It begins with a fluvial geomorphic assessment as the basis for evaluating and prioritizing potential restoration projects, a draft working restoration plan and implementation of at least one restoration project.  

Long term Success

The Apalachicola River and Estuary system is of exceptional ecological importance, and constitutes one of the least polluted, most undeveloped, resource-rich systems left in the United States. It has been designated by the United Nations as an International Biosphere Reserve, by the United States as a National Estuarine Research Reserve, and by the State of Florida as an Outstanding Florida Water. The River harbors the most diverse assemblage of freshwater fish in Florida, the largest number of species of freshwater snails and mussels, and the most endemic species in western Florida. 

After restoration, Apalachicola Bay will remain one of the most productive estuaries in the northern hemisphere, historically supporting commercially important oyster beds and a wide variety of fish, and providing habitat for migratory birds and other animals. The river basin is home to some of the highest densities of reptile and amphibian species on the continent. The Apalachicola River and Bay are closely linked, as River waters and its inundated floodplain is the biological factory that fuels the productivity of the estuary. 

Program Success Monitored By Geofluvial Morphologist, Dr. Matt Kondolf, Apalachicola Riverkeeper and multiple NGO partner organizations implementing the program
Examples of Program Success  

To date, there has been no over-arching framework or plan for restoration of the Apalachicola River and Bay.  Funds are requested to provide an overall strategy for restoration of the entire Apalachicola River system in light of historical geomorphic, hydrologic, and ecological changes and altered processes, and establish a scientifically-sound basis for prioritizing and implementing projects. 

An effective restoration program for Apalachicola River must be based on scientific understanding of the flows of water, sediment, nutrients, and biota, and the linkages among system components, including the main stem river, sloughs, floodplain, shallow groundwater, estuarine tidal wetlands, and open waters of the bay. The scientific understanding can be expressed in a conceptual model of essential physical and ecological processes, and the key connections, both longitudinal (upstream-downstream) and lateral (main channel-sloughs-floodplain). 

Program Comments
CEO Statement/Executive Director/Board Comments  

A message we recently received from a Riverkeeper member

Dear Apalachicola Riverkeeper,

I just pulled my canoe out of the Chattahoochee River in North Atlanta and I now am fighting the congested traffic towards my home while thinking about this email to you. The traffic gets worse every day. The river this fall day was beautiful, even though it smelled a little sour. I did notice more new sewer lines. There has been little rain in the last few weeks, so today there was a steady humming noise from the water pumps pumping free water out of the river to irrigate all the home owners’ thirsty lawns and the acres and acres of golf courses with pretty green grass.

I am member of the Chattahoochee Riverkeeper and I do appreciate their hard work trying to keep the river flowing your way. However, I am sure that even the Chatt Riverkeeper would agree: Apalachicola Riverkeeper's job is much tougher.

I am not sure Floridians are fully aware of what is happening to their water upstream. One million new families make Georgia their home every few years. Each person wants a family, a home, a lawn, a toilet and a shower. Each person needs a car and a place to work. Each person contributes to what water is pulled out of the rivers… and poured, flushed, spilled or washed back into the rivers flowing to Florida's Apalachicola Bay, every day.

Politicians and developers in Georgia, Alabama and Florida know that more people and industry means more political and financial influence and more votes…and more money for them. Government is doing all it can to attract more and more people, businesses and factories in order to generate more tax revenue to build more infrastructure to accommodate the ever-expanding population. In the near future Atlanta will be a never ending city from Macon, GA to Chattanooga, TN and to Greenville, SC.

All the best,

Ed Giles

North Atlanta

Board Chair
Board Chair Craig Diamond
Company Affiliation Board President
Term Mar 2015 to Mar 2016
Email cjdiamond@comcast.net
Board Co-Chair
Board CoChair Georgia Ackerman
Company Affiliation Board VP
Term Mar 2015 to Mar 2016
Email Georgiaackerman@earthlink.net
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Georgia Ackerman Business Owner
Don Ashley Retired
Jack Carbone Retired
Craig Diamond Retired
Joyce Estes Retired
Mark Friedman Community Volunteer
Bradley Hartman Retired
Tom Herzog Community Volunteer
John Inzetta Fisherman
Rebecca Jetton Community Volunteer
Charley Kienzle Community Volunteer
John Robert Middlemas Retired
Barbara Sanders Attorney
C. Chadwick Taylor Land Manager
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 14
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 11
Female 3
Governance
Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 66%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 90%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 6
Standing Committees
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Fundraising
Donor Services
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Ms. Shannon Lease M.S.
Term Start May 2012
Email shannon@apalachicolariverkeeper.org
Experience  Shannon Lease, M.S., C.P.M, Executive Director – organizational planning, strategy and leadership; Board management, public relations and management, day-to-day operational oversight event planning, coordination and fundraising; donor relations and management; marketing and organizational communications.  25 years experience in Non-profit/State program management.
Senior Staff
Title Apalachicola Riverkeeper
Experience/Biography 30 years experience in watershed management. Served as Apalachicola Riverkeeper since 2004 (10 years)
Title
Experience/Biography
Staff
Full Time Staff 2
Part Time Staff 0
Volunteers 50
Contractors 1
Retention Rate 100%
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
NonManagement Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Plans & Policies
Organization has a Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has a Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers N/A
Date Strategic Plan Adopted Jan 2009
Management Succession Plan? Yes
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
Collaborations

Northwest Florida Water Management District, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, US Fish and Wildlife Service

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, ACF Stakeholders, Florida Greenways and Trails Program, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Department of Economic Opportunity

Tates Hell State Forest, Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, US Army Corps of Engineers

US EPA, US Department of Agriculture, Florida Wildlife Federation, National Wildlife Federation

American Rivers, Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, Clean Water Network, WaterKeeper Alliance

Chattahoochee Riverkeeper, Flint Riverkeeper, Water Protection Network

The six riparian counties in Florida (Franklin, Gadsden, Calhoun, Liberty, Gulf and Jackson) riparian local municipal governments (Marianna, Carrabelle, Apalachicola, Chattahochee, Blountstown, Wewahitchka, Bristol) SMARRT Group (Seafood Management Assistance Recovery and Restoration Team) 
Awards
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Community Steward of the Year1000 Friends of Florida2005
Water Conservation Organization of the YearFlorida Wildlife Federation2004
Conservation AwardApalachee Audobon Society2003
Apalachicola Blueway Trail DesignationUnited States Department of Interior2014
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2015
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2015
Projected Revenue $208,475.00
Projected Expenses $208,100.00
Spending Policy N/A
Form 990s
Form 9902013
9902012
9902011
9902010
Audit or In-House Financial Documents
Audit2012
Audit2011
Audit2010
IRS Letter of Dtermination
Detailed Financials
 
 
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
------
Government Contributions$20,000$88,644$34,633
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$20,000$88,644$34,633
Individual Contributions$228,622$126,937$174,041
$0----
$2,895$2,573$20,020
Investment Income, Net of Losses$44$86$302
Membership Dues$0----
Special Events$21,092$1,363--
Revenue In-Kind$2,726$625$950
Other$779$2,721$1,703
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$195,580$193,823$218,786
Administration Expense$18,563$41,683$24,306
Fundraising Expense$19,639$36,156$39,433
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.170.820.82
Program Expense/Total Expenses84%71%77%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue7%17%19%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$110,123$79,724$123,078
Current Assets$83,634$59,930$97,242
Long-Term Liabilities$5,727$1,881$0
Current Liabilities$6,138$15,611$44,116
Total Net Assets$98,258$62,232$78,962
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities13.633.842.20
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets5%2%0%
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Organization Comments Conducts Audits every 2 years
Additional Documents
State Charitable Solicitations Permit
View
Nonprofit Apalachicola Bay and Riverkeeper, Inc.
Address Box 8
232-b Water Street
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Primary Phone 850 653-8936
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Shannon Lease M.S.
Board Chair Craig Diamond
Board Chair Company Affiliation Board President
Year of Incorporation 1999